Established in 2016, Portfolio Construction Forum Finology Summit is THE behavioural finance ("fin") and investment psychology ("ology") program of the year. It will help you better identify and understand how your own and other people's different investing biases, beliefs and behaviours impact investment markets and portfolio construction practices - and therefore, investment outcomes - to help you build better quality investor portfolios.

Established in 2002, Strategies Conference is THE portfolio construction strategies conference of the year. It will challenge and refresh your portfolio construction thinking by debating contemporary and emerging portfolio construction strategies, to consider applying in practice to build better quality portfolios.

Finology is the interesting and unique mix of behavioural finance ("fin") and investor psychology ("ology") as it relates to giving investment advice to individual investors.

Graham Rich | 0.25 CE

Classical economists often incorporated human behaviour into their thinking. But in the 1960s and 1970s, homo economicus - the great rational agent of economic theory - was born. It was not until the 1990s that the link between human behaviour and economics began to be re-established.

Herman Brodie | 0.25 CE

Behavioural finance supplements traditional financial and investment theory. Findings in the field of behavioural finance may help advisers, consultants and clients better manage their thoughts, feelings, and actions when investing.

Ron Bird | 2.75 CE

These tutorials relate to various of the IMAC lectures and are available to CIMA candidates currently completing the Investment Management Analyst Certificate course.

Beliefs interact with investors' biases and preferences to ultimately influence their behaviour. Two recent papers highlight the impact of individual investors' beliefs about the future and the impact on portfolio behaviour and composition, as well as market returns.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

To say a lot has changed since I spoke to you back in February at Markets Summit 2020 is an incredible understatement. Between now and Markets Summit in February 2021, I'm going to be watching three things.

Relatively little is known about what greed is and does. These two papers highlight the importance of greed in economic behaviour, and to a greater chance of engaging in ethically questionable behaviour.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

Culture explains much about how we think, feel, and behave. These two papers explore the influence of culture and cultural distance in a financial context.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

Understanding what has really changed in people's values as a result of Covid-19 and the influence of emotions will prepare us for the increasingly polarised economic, geopolitical, social and environmental new world order.

These two papers provide a more sophisticated, behavioural understanding of time discounting, to enable more nuanced conversations with clients about current and future consumption, and help mitigate the potentially negative impacts of present bias.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

It turns out that 'retiring’ and withdrawing from productive life actually conflicts with our own natural drivers of well-being. The concept of ‘retirement’ is an obsolescent by-product of the industrial era that needs to be retired.

Michael Kitces | 0.50 CE

These two research papers present insights into how advisers can better assess and guide how clients think about and structure goals - including savings goals.

Rob Hamshar | 2 comments | 1.00 CE

Humans categorise and form stories about their world - including their financial lives. Two recent papers emphasise the implications of mental accounting, particularly for any investment professional in a client-facing role.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

Regardless of how QSuper justifies their focus on limited advice, they cannot justify calling it advice. It is a product recommendation.

Two research papers exploring regret can help us improve how investment decision-making and outcomes are framed with clients and offer deeper insight into clients' personal and financial goals and priorities.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

The Investment Management Research Program is the academic research unit of Portfolio Construction Forum, the specialist, independent provider of portfolio construction continuing education, accreditation and certification services in Australia and NZ. The IMR Program aims to advance investment management research by curating courses, workshops and symposia focused on the spectrum of issues involved in designing and building investment portfolios.

The performance of stock markets during the coronavirus pandemic seems to defy logic - until one considers possible explanations based on crowd psychology.

We make automatic assumptions on a daily basis. A critical assumption is that our pre-crisis investment management toolkit will remain relevant in the future.

The endowment effect is the tendency for people who own a good to value it more than people who do not. Its economic impact is consequential. Two recent papers offer important and very useful insights for investment professionals.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

The line between "error" and "reasonable human functioning" is remarkably vague. This Research Review focuses on a widely-cited paper that thoroughly unpacks the various concepts under the umbrella of confirmation bias.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

Memory is far from being a repository of neutral, reliable information and accounts of past events. This Research Review focuses on a seminal paper published in 1999 on "the seven sins of memory", and a recent 2019 paper on how memory errors impact investment decisions.

Rob Hamshar | 1.00 CE

The funds management industry has spawned a lot of gurus. This research paper looks at whether market forecasters are any good at what they do.

Ron Bird | 1.00 CE

The move to compulsory superannuation placed huge responsibility on individuals to manage their portfolios. A regular response is to educate people to a higher level of financial literacy.

Ron Bird | 1.00 CE

We are feeling the anxiety effects of not one pandemic but two - the COVID-19 pandemic and a pandemic of anxiety about its economic consequences. The two are different, but inseparable.

If there's one common refrain from financial advisers about the field of finology, it's that the research and concepts are fascinating, but it's hard to know exactly how to apply them in the financial advice process. There are so many finology concepts, how does an adviser sort the most important ones to focus on? What can advisers do to ensure their own unconscious beliefs and biases don't undermine the client relationship and investment outcomes? What specific actions can advisers take to systematically apply finology insights to improve the advice experience and outcomes for clients? This workshop will focus on insights from the inaugural Finology Benchmarking Indices (FBI) and facilitate self-reflection and scenario-based exercises to help you form a personalised action plan to embed finology concepts into your practice.

Giving Voice to Values (GVV) is an innovative approach to values-driven leadership development in business education and the workplace. GVV is not about persuading people to be more ethical. Rather, it starts from the premise that most of us already want to act on our values, but that we also want to feel that we have a reasonable chance of doing so effectively and successfully. To raise those odds, rather than a focus on ethical analysis, GVV focuses on ethical implementation and asks: "What if I were going to act on my values? What would I say and do? How could I be most effective?"

Since the 1980s, the efficient markets hypothesis has come under attack. Market anomalies were initially attributed to the actions of noise traders, who were believed to hold irrational beliefs and standard preferences. There was an expectation that such actors would lose their wealth over the long run via arbitrage, albeit that the effectiveness of arbitrageurs was restricted by various risks and costs. In the 1990s, psychologists identified additional limits to arbitrage which are tied to human nature. This workshop will explore these additional limits, namely: bounded rationality; the need for well-being; and, self-control problems.

Working with clients takes more than just modelling financial outcomes. Better results are gained when investment advisers really understand their clients and truly connect with them. This workshop provides training in key counselling techniques and skills such as: reflective listening; managing resistance; and, empathic responding. You will learn how to apply counselling skills, incorporating a range of typical examples (e.g. dealing with grief, managing redundancy and planning for retirement), how to manage resistance and motivate clients using counselling skills and professional ethics during the interviewing process.

Most of us want to act on our values, but we also need to feel that we have a reasonable chance of doing so effectively and successfully. Rather than focus on ethical analysis, focus on ethical implementation.

Mary Gentile | 0.50 CE

Refocusing sustainable investing efforts onto client values and beliefs starts a chain reaction that delivers sustainable outcomes for clients and long-lasting relationships.

Used responsibly, artificial intelligence can help us make wiser decisions as investors and capital allocators and help us work towards a more sustainable and inclusive future.

Paras Anand | 0.50 CE

New research shows that media sources generate emotions that transmit to individuals and so influence their investment decisions, resulting in a departure from so-called efficient markets.

Ron Bird | 0.25 CE

Behaviour biases determine that performance drives managed fund flows. By examining managed fund transactions, we can confirm that investment adviser engagement with investors is critical, and ascribe a value to it.

Douglas Isles | 0.25 CE

By identifying their own systematic patterns of departure from "rational" behaviour, practitioners can compensate for their effects, and improve the quality of their day-to-day investment decision-making.

Andrew Inwood | 0.50 CE

Over shorter periods of time, there are market inefficiencies due to well researched behavioural biases. Knowledge of these can help improve our own investment decision making and that of our clients.

Dan Farley | 0.25 CE

Several of our Faculty discuss their key takeouts from Finology Summit 2020, to help delegates think through how people's different investing biases, beliefs and behaviours impact investment outcomes.

Expert Panel | 0.75 CE

Using the language of client values and behaviour will help build a foundation of trust, and assist investment advisers architect a portfolio that is in sync with clients' lives and values.

Wade Matterson | 0.50 CE

Behavioural biases get in the way of good investment decision-making. A well-structured approach to goals-based planning can go a long way to defeating the worst impacts of many of these biases.

Tim Farrelly | 0.25 CE

A fixed point of reference, in the context of investment risks and uncertainties, can induce biases in approaches to meet client objectives. These biases will be costly to investors in the long term.

Rudi Minbatiwala | 0.50 CE

As we scramble to make sense of occurrences such as coronavirus and climate change, the application of prior cultivated imagination can preserve the integrity of investment decision making.

Grant Mizens | 0.50 CE

Finology is an interesting and unique mix of behavioural finance (“fin”) and investor psychology (“ology”) as it relates to giving investment advice to individual investors. Finology is where investing meets investors™. The finology discipline focuses on identifying investing biases, beliefs and behaviours and the investment outcomes. To achieve this, finology connects behavioural finance and investor psychology - encompassing "know the markets", "know yourself" and "know your clients". Finology knowledge and skills help us better identify and understand how our own and other people's different investing biases, beliefs and behaviours impact investment markets and portfolio construction practices - and therefore, investment outcomes - to enable better quality investor portfolios.

Trade Wars, the US Election, Brexit 3.0, natural disasters and pandemic risks are causing fear and uncertainty in Australian equity investors. The key to capturing opportunities is to focus on what matters to long-term returns.

Patrick Hodgens | 0.25 CE

To fully appreciate the risks and opportunities in a high VUCA environment, portfolio construction practitioners must adopt a mindful approach in order to adapt to unexpected events.

Established in 2016, Finology Summit is THE behavioural finance ("fin") and investment psychology ("ology") program of the year. The 1.5-day, face-to-face and online learning program is designed and curated by our specialist, experienced and independent team and features an exceptional Faculty of experts from around the world. Each offers his/her best high conviction ideas on behavioural finance and/or investor psychology, and the investment implications.

Portfolio Construction Forum Finology Summit is THE behavioural finance ("fin") and investment psychology ("ology") program of the year. It will help you better identify and understand how your own and other people's different investing biases, beliefs and behaviours impact investment markets and portfolio construction practices - and therefore, investment outcomes - to help you build better quality investor portfolios.

Financial decisions are among the most important life-shaping decisions we make. Two recent research papers provide further evidence as to how practitioners can help improve clients' financial decisions.

Ron Bird | 1.00 CE